A sixth-grader in Alabama is well-aware of the dangers of school shootings, so much so that he felt he needed to draw up a will.

Javon Davies told WIAT that he had written a letter that detailed which of his belongings would go to his friend if he were killed in a school shooting.

— Heartbreaking video of father painting mural for son killed in school massacre is all you need to see to support gun control — 

“It was a Playstation 4, plus controllers, plus the game that goes to it, my cat, my TV, my XBox,” he told the station.

Javon said that he felt he needed to prepare “just in case” after a recent threat to his school in Birmingham.

“It was just in case something happened to one of us because some kids get rowdy up and might end up getting somebody shot or something,” he said.

— Black teachers respond to Trump’s proposal to arm them with guns in the classroom — 

Javon also wrote a message to his family for them to read if the worst happens: “You gave me the clothes on my back and you stuck with me all the time. Love, Javon.”

His mother, Mariama Davies, was shocked by the letter and by the real terror that kids face simply going to school.

“He just shouldn’t have to go through that period because for what? He’s in 6th grade. You have a lot ahead of you and these things going on you shouldn’t have to worry about, go through, or even think about,” Davies told WIAT.

— After school shooting, teens stage ‘lie-in’ outside of White House calling for gun reform —

Kids are speaking out on gun violence

Javon isn’t the only kid worried about gun violence. Ever since the tragic Parkland school shooting that left 17 people dead, teenagers around the country have been coming out in force to demand #NeverAgain.

Staging walkouts, lie-ins, marches, and town halls, these kids are demanding that their government offer them the protection to learn in school without the threat of death hanging over their heads. Led by many of the survivors from Parkland, these kids are keeping the conversation going.

When gun violence is so pervasive that a 6th grader feels he has to prepare for being murdered, you know enough is enough.